Motivation

The first "tude" I want to talk about is "gratitude,"  because the more you express gratitude for what you have, the more you will have to express gratitude for.  It's equally true that you will never find a happy person who is not a grateful person, so gratitude is a marvelous place to start.

The way people talk is the best indication of how they think, and the most powerful instrument for influencing a person's thought process is the spoken word.  This is especially true if the word is delivered with passion and conviction.  

The late William Arthur "Bill" Ward was and is one of my favorite writers.  His insights and ability to put a philosophy of life into a few words were truly remarkable.  Here's a sample from his book, Reward Yourself.

A man phoned his physician and excitedly exclaimed: "Please come at once, Doctor.  My son has swallowed my fountain pen."

The doctor replied, "I'll be right over.  But what are you doing in the meanwhile?"

"Using a pencil," answered the father.

Most of us remember the story of the goose that laid the golden eggs.  The owner of the goose discovered a golden egg in the goose's nest.  Each morning there was another, so instead of patiently waiting for the goose to lay those eggs each day, he foolishly killed the goose, thinking he would find himself a mine of golden eggs.  Of course, there were none.  Most of us as small children thought the story was interesting and was apparently designed to teach us a lesson in patience.

1. You clearly understand that failure is an event, not a person; that yesterday ended last night, and today is your brand new day.

2. You have made friends with your past, are focused on the present, and optimistic about your future.

3. You know that success (a win) doesn't make you, and failure (a loss) doesn't break you.

4. You are filled with faith, hope and love; and live without anger, greed, guilt, envy, or thoughts of revenge.

5. You are mature enough to delay gratification and shift your focus from your rights to your responsibilities.

1. You clearly understand that failure is an event, not a person; that yesterday ended last night, and today is your brand new day.

2. You have made friends with your past, are focused on the present, and optimistic about your future.

3. You know that success (a win) doesn't make you, and failure (a loss) doesn't break you.

4. You are filled with faith, hope and love; and live without anger, greed, guilt, envy, or thoughts of revenge.

5. You are mature enough to delay gratification and shift your focus from your rights to your responsibilities.

A past issue of Forbes Magazine revealed that entrepreneurs who were financially successful had, in most cases, moved from one city to another.  Now before you start packing your bags, let me point out that some of them had moved from Denver to Dallas, but others had moved from Dallas to Denver.  Some had moved from Chicago to St. Louis, but still others had moved from St. Louis to Chicago.  These entrepreneurs all had some things in common. They planned to succeed, prepared to succeed, expected to succeed and made the commitment to succeed.

At first glance this column heading seems to be contradictory, but it is absolutely true that the person who won't take a chance hasn't got a chance.  For example, when you invest in the stock market, you are taking a chance.  There is risk involved.  But, historically speaking, if you invest sensibly and go for the long haul, your returns will be consistent and appreciably larger than you would receive from an interest-only deposit.

 

The story is told about a farmer who went into an automobile dealership to buy a stripped-down model and ended up with all the "bells and whistles."  The $14,000 car turned into a $22,000 car.  He loved all the "extras," but, frankly, he had exceeded his budget.  A few months later he had a chance to at least partially balance the scale.  The salesman who sold him the car showed up at his farm to buy a cow.  After carefully looking them over, he made his choice and asked the question, "How much?"  

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